Tips to Protect Your Special Furry Valentine

DOG KISSES

February is the month for love. Whether you’re taking someone special out for a dinner and sending chocolate and flowers, or if you’re spending the day with friends sharing in each other’s companionship, don’t forget about your furry Valentine at home.

The one who’s there waiting for you each day to get home and snuggle. These special Valentine’s deserve some appreciation for Cupid’s holiday too. In addition to being an important day to fill them up with kisses and affection, it can also be a dangerous day for pets.

With all of the chocolate and other hazards lying around the house, there’s an increased chance your pet will ingest something dangerous.

Follow these tips to keep your special four-legged, love-bug safe this holiday.

Keep all chocolate high-up and safely tucked away.

You’re likely already aware that chocolate is a no-no for dogs. On Valentine’s Day, when you or your kids are coming home with cardboard hearts filled with these treats, you might easily place it on the kitchen counter or forget it’s sitting in your open bag that you put down.

To your dog, it smells sweet and they’d like to check things out, but the problem is that chocolate contains theobromine which works much the same as caffeine in our systems, causing their hearts to race and could lead to seizures and death. All kinds of chocolates from cheap to expensive, dark to sugar-free are all of extreme danger. Exercise caution when you bring them into a home with pets.

Clean-up any candies that fall to the floor.

While most people are aware that chocolate is dangerous for dogs, other candies less commonly talked about being toxic include low sugar gummies and hardened fruit candies. These are very dangerous and could easily be missed if they fall to the floor and your pet eats them. The problem is that many have artificial sugar in them (xylitol) that increases insulin in the pancreas and can lead to liver damage and blood clots if consumed. If your child eats candy around the house or you hear a piece fall to the floor when you’re picking at your Valentine loot, move quickly to clean it up before your pet eats it to keep them safe.

Understand which plants and flowers are toxic.

Just behind candies as a gift on Valentine’s Day, are flowers. Some lovers might deliver a bouquet of traditional roses, but others might be unique and choose a bouquet with an arrangement of different blooms. It’s important to know which might be harmful to your pets before you bring them into your home. When it comes to cats, lily’s are toxic; for dogs daffodils, azalea’s and tulips are a few that can cause problems.

The best way to protect your pet from these unintended harmful situations is to be vigilant about creating a safe home for this furry member of the family to enjoy.

Setting indoor boundaries that allow pet’s access to only certain parts of the house can also help curb concerns.

DogWatch Hidden Fences of Western Massachusetts can come in and guide you through the process of setting up a containment system that gives your pet ultimate freedom. The indoor hidden fence system includes safe wireless technology so you don’t need to put up baby gates or worry what your pet is getting into when you’re not home.

Get in touch today to get started!